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How to Deter Vandalism in Park Restrooms

How to Deter Vandalism in Park Restrooms

Vandalism in Park Restrooms is a prevalent problem. Unfortunately, public restrooms are often the focus of many vandals, who are intent on committing defacement.  Restrooms become the target because they are usually placed away from public traffic and isolated.  Due largely in part to the low risk of being caught, graffiti on the walls and damage to toilets and the restroom facility hardware are among the objects most commonly affected.

 

Due to safety reasons, many parks close vandalized restrooms in order to avoid injury and facilitate repairs. Park Rangers know closed restrooms can cause a feeling of frustration by park patrons who may need to use the restroom area. The best option is deterrence.  Stop the Vandalism before it happens.

 

Here are some deterrent highlights to implement:

 

  1. Lighting– Secure the area with bright lights. Bright lights are a vandal’s worst enemy. Lighting installed in areas that may otherwise be dark does well to help prevent acts of vandalism from occurring.
  2. Unbreakable Fixtures and Hardware– Apply security glass over light fixtures and hard to break accessories in the restroom.
  3. Locks and Fencing- Install locks and fencing. Well strategized locks and fencing eliminates a vandal’s ability to enter the restroom after the park has closed.
  4. Vandalism Deterrent Cameras– Properly placed Vandalism Deterrent Cameras near problem areas combined with signs informing the public of their use has been proven to prevent acts of vandalism. Vandalism Deterrent Cameras- Talk, shine a bright light, take pictures for prosecution and make their presence known. Behavior modification at its best.

 

Applying these steps will protect public bathrooms and save frustrations and funds from ongoing repairs.

 

 

The High Cost of Vandalism

The High Cost of Vandalism

With a population of about 1-4 million citizens, the larger cities are the home to a diverse array of vandalism crimes. A city’s sprawling square-mileage features suburban neighborhoods, cosmopolitan-style downtown living, as well as industrial and factory-based businesses. Of all the crimes that cities experience, the only one that pervades all areas of the city is that of vandalism.

 

While the term vandalism is defined in Wikipedia as “the deliberate, malicious destruction or damage of public or private property”, the crime of vandalism can be broken down into different categories. Graffiti and defacement, window-breaking, and even arson all find themselves under the umbrella term of vandalism, with graffiti often being the most prevalent form of the crime.

 

Because of the high cost associated with an act of vandalism, many people consider vandalism to be one of the most expensive problems cities have to deal with. Los Angeles alone spends roughly $7 million annually on graffiti removal and prevention, while the overall cost of vandalism for the city’s taxpayers is much higher. These figures, however, do not include the cost of damages caused by vandalism on private property, which business and property owners must pay out of their own pocket to repair.

 

Damage caused by criminal acts, like scrap metal theft, are another prominent form of vandalism. City-owned utility properties, such as electricity distribution centers, can cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars to replace damaged and stolen equipment by a thief’s intent on making a couple of bucks.

 

With such a high cost associated with any act of vandalism, the price of such a crime is placed on the citizens of the community in which it takes place. As most of the budgets for a large city are already heavily constrained, money spent to repair damages caused by vandalism would be beneficial to other, more productive, city-run programs.

 

 

Public water

Protect Public Water Facilities from Vandalism

If water storage chambers, pumps, or valves are vandalized, even if it is a childish prank, it is an act that compromises the water treatment facility.  To ensure the safety of the public, The Department of Public Works will need to sanitize the water and pass the water inspections of State and Federal standards, because vandalizing or any outside contact with the water treatment process may cause an imbalance in the treatment facility’s bionetwork.

The cost involved in bringing back the integrity of the water in the storage chambers involves treating the water a second time with the entire treatment process, in order to sanitize it.  Water reservation and services are supposed to be kept as cheap as possible, however, when the water storage is disturbed by outside contaminates from vandalism, this causes the Water Department to raise their budget in order to sanitize the polluted water.

It is mandatory, therefore, to maintain the efficiency of water equipment in prestige condition.  The Water Utility Operations must guard the equipment from corrosion, and protect its infrastructure of the water facilities.  A damaged water-treatment system compromises the water of the entire community, causing public schools and other organizations to shut down until the water system is repaired and properly treated.

Preventing vandalism within water department perimeters is essential. Some water treatment plants have installed walls and gates with barbed wire to deter trespassing.  However, persistent vandals overcome these barriers, therefore other deterrents are required. Other tools to consider are crime deterrent cameras using a motion sensor that will illuminate the area approached and will capture and help identify the trespassers.   Since crime deterrent cameras are self-contained and require no electricity, they can be placed in even the most remote areas of the water treatment plant.

The public water system is a process that is important to protect, and it is essential to guard its equipment from vandals.  Ensuring the entire community is drinking safe water cannot be compromised.  Protect the water treatment plant and use as many resources as possible to prevent vandalism.

How to Deter School Vandalism

How to Deter School Vandalism

In some ways, destroying another person’s property can be misconstrued as a means of “blowing off steam”. Some may even argue that some form of vandalism is art and beneficial to the community. Few argue against the fact  that vandalism is destroying property owned by someone else.  If that property is public property, it is owned by all in the community, not just a few who decide to destroy it. Nonetheless, vandalism in all forms is a serious crime with serious side-effects, and it’s committed all too commonly.

Unfortunately, a great percentage of the perpetrators are children, and schools become their target. When one student sees their peer commit an act of vandalism there is more likely to be second occurrence with a different student.  Children mimic what they see, and once one child breaks the ice and crosses that first boundary, it becomes that much easier for another child to join in.

The consequences of these crimes  are severe and affect everyone in the community, both directly and indirectly.  As a community caring for the next generation, we must do what we can to prevent these crimes from occurring.


 

Here are three key suggestions the community can do to help prevent these instances,  assist our children and help our schools stand against school vandalism:

Educate

Spending time with and talking to children about the importance of responsibility.  Respecting other people’s property is a very important lesson for everyone to learn.  This education should take place in the family but should be reinforced within the community, either through the school or community groups.

 Active Programs

Extracurricular activities like youth centers, athletics, and after-school study groups with current programs keep the kids busy and healthy.

 Visible Security

Visible security in the form of officers, cameras and posted signs introduces the idea to the possible mischief maker that there is a possibility that they may get caught. The idea of getting caught takes on a form of responsibility within the mind, and this in turn reduces the prospect of a crime occurring.