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Keeping the Community Safe

Keeping the Community Safe

It takes a great deal of effort and intentionality to keep a community safe. Half the battle is knowing a community intimately. Only when a municipality is intimately acquainted with its community will it be able to make an organized effort to address the key issues plaguing the community. Taking action without knowledge is utter folly, a waste of energy and resources. Without being in tune with the needs of the community, all the efforts of the governing municipality to keep the community safe are likened to the futile efforts of a blindfolded goalie trying to guard his goal. Thankfully, the police department of Mount Rainier, MD has realized the need to be well acquainted with the community.

The Mount Rainier police department is constantly engaging their community through special events and neighborhood walkthroughs. Patrol officers are required to walk around the neighborhoods for at least one hour outside of their vehicles so that they can meet the citizens under their protection. Police officers also visit nursing homes, schools, and local organizations to foster a warm and intentional presence in the community. It is because of these practices that the Mount Rainier police department is effectively protecting its community. If the police were not immersed in the community, they would not know what crimes were happening, nor how to stop them.

Visibility is key to keeping a community safe. Municipalities can maximize their presence in the community by imitating the engagement policies of the Mount Rainier Police Department as well as utilizing the correct tools to stop and deter crime. Crime deterrent cameras provide the extra edge needed to complete any community’s security efforts.

 

Tools Needed to Stop Vandalism

Tools Needed to Stop Vandalism

Unfortunately, disadvantaged neighborhoods suffer from the highest crime rates. Once certain kinds of crime infect a neighborhood, it becomes trapped in a vicious, downward spiral of depravity. One of the crimes which contributes to this downward spiral most is vandalism. Vandalism is an incredibly visible crime that communicates weak surveillance and law enforcement to the community, law-keepers and criminals alike. Thus, vandalism indirectly causes more crime in its setting. Furthermore, the damages caused by vandalism increases tax rates and insurance rates in communities, further debilitating the local economy. The resulting environment is a depressing and threatening one.

The negative effects of vandalism especially harms youths as they are heavily influenced by their environment. The costs of vandalism siphon money away from school funding and other beneficial city functions.  Vandalism robs children of the safety of knowing there is an authority that cares enough to prevent others from destroying property.  More than half the vandalism crimes are associated with 13-14 year old youths who may be seeking attention, acceptance, or venting their angst in a destructive manner. The criminal activity of the youths will only doom their fate to remain bleak and dismal, but they are most likely not aware of this.

The best option to rescue these neighborhoods is through forming strong communal bonds and actively preventing crimes like vandalism. The presence of strong bonds between neighbors is shown to reduce crime rates and improve the lives of adolescents. However, communities need the right tools to combat the war against vandalism. A robust crime deterrent system has been created that is especially designed to stop nuisance crimes like vandalism. These vandalism cameras go beyond identifying anyone who trespasses on property.  They are a tool a community needs to change the behavior of the vandals and effectively prevent vandalism from taking place.

#novandalism #stopvandals #parksandrecreation #weareparksandrec #publicworks #security

Vandalism During the Pandemic

Vandalism During the Pandemic

Social distancing is the new norm for our society during this pandemic. Most people have been staying safe inside their homes. Unfortunately, there are some who are taking advantage of this momentous opportunity to do harm to their local communities.

While cities remain closed, they now face the concerns and troubles that come from vandalism including “spray-painted bleachers, missing signage, damaged athletic fields, torn-up synthetic playground surfacing and deliberately dismantled playground equipment.”

Vandalism is costly and dangerous to communities. Destructive activity tends to increase when people are vacant, such as holidays or weekends. Sadly, rascals are taking advantage of the pandemic and creating a heyday, intending to vandalize and terrorize cities. Local parks receive the worst of the damage.

What should a community do?

Here are some measures that cities should take to protect their cities from vandalism during this pandemic:

  • Communities should offer after school virtual programs for youth, especially inviting to those with destructive tendencies.
  • Cities should increase their budget for educating the community on how much vandalism costs them.
  • Security measures should be implemented, such as crime deterrent cameras that prevent vandalism.

Vandalism is damaging to communities, but it can be fought by investing a little effort into crime prevention tools and systems, such as the examples above.

Don’t Compromise your Parks to Vandalism

Don’t Compromise your Parks to Vandalism

Imagine your favorite childhood playground. What comes to mind when you picture it? More than likely, you reminisce over fond childhood memories, gliding down a shiny, bright-red slide and flying high on the chain-link swing then jumping off to see how far you’ll land. If you lived in a city that cared about parks, you probably don’t think of vandalism or graffiti in the form of broken-down park benches and swear words scratched into the play equipment. However because parks are often targeted, cities pay large amounts of money to fix damages done to parks to ensure the beauty of recreation sites.

In Louisville, KY, a 2015 report showed that since 2010, there have been nearly $400,000 worth of damages done to city parks (https://wfpl.org/breaking-cost-vandalism-louisvilles-parks/). Among the damages are graffiti and theft. A common occurrence that Louisville parks face is stolen trash cans. Thieves can make around $3 for reselling a metal trash can, whereas it costs parks $10 to replace. This seemingly small number adds up to a sum that could be used towards city events or updating community gathering areas.

Unfortunately, vandalism and destruction are fates that public places regularly face, but there are ways to minimize the damage and costs that parks encounter on an annual basis:

  • Purchase unbreakable equipment that is difficult to steal (i.e. trash cans that are fused to the cement)
  • Install gates with locks 
  • Install bright lights
  • Install anti-vandalism cameras

Accepting the ruin of a community recreational site is not an option. And cities should not forfeit large bulks of money to protect the beauty of their parks. Anti-Vandalism Cameras are a great resource to protect and deter vandalism and graffiti.

#Nograffiti #Novandalism #ProtectParks #WeAreParksAndRec #StopVandalism