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Illegal Dumping Crisis Keeping Cities in Debt

There are massive, public complaints about illegal-dump sites, community eyesores lowering property values, all over the country. A lot of cities experience vicious dumping cycles in known targeted areas. Due to the sites usually being remote, these sites create huge challenges, especially in the city’s budget. Unfortunately, a city’s resources, which is already limited, must now be used to clean up and install methods to prevent the Illegal dumping problem.

Illegal dumping, also known as “fly-tipping”, wreaks tremendous havoc on the city government pocketbook. Oakland, for example, has an illegal trash catastrophe that is costing more than 5-million dollars per year.

In addition to the obvious costs,  an illegal dump site can cause a concern that the sites are forming a hazardous environment.  Hazardous materials and chemicals illegally disposed may leak dangerous toxins, which are poisonous to both people and wildlife.  Another fact to note is this environment of waste-piles increase the risk of fires, according to the Hall County Board of Commissioners. This could be caused by the glass or the pollutants which could be flammable.

The threat of illegal trash spots causing a fire hazard should be a high concern to cities.  A fire started due to an illegal dumping problem may cause damage that will cost a city an immense amount of distress and resources, which further puts a city in debt. Fires caused by illegal-dumping is costing many cities millions.  Imagine the arduous work and resources that are required for restoration because  of damage caused by an abundant fire.

Another financial nuisance to take note of, is how a small illegal-dumping location may turn into a larger open-dump site, leading to an even bigger strain on a city budget. Just a few, small molehills can quickly turn into mountains of moles if they aren’t exterminated in a timely fashion. Likewise, illegal dumping is dangerous and costly if not stopped in time. It is therefore wise to take advantage of every preventative measure possible to keep these nuisances from growing out of control and from stealing the cities’ financial resources.

Garbage

Illegal Dumping – Breeding Mosquitoes

Illegal dumping sites are a breeding ground for all kinds of diseases and mosquitoes.  In addition to rodents and the microscopic organisms, there are the disease carrying insects.  These creatures enter into the human domain, carrying with them their diseases, or become infected after biting a disease carrying source.  Some diseases transmitted by the mosquito in North America are Malaria, West Nile Virus, Encephalitis, and the most recent scare, Zika Fever.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Mosquitoes require water to undergo their life cycle.  The four stages of life, hatching from an egg to becoming an adult flying insect, can take anywhere from 4 days to a few months, depending on the temperature and other environmental factors.  The female flying insect then searches for a blood meal, which can be an animal or a human.  After feeding, the female mosquito lays the eggs on or near water.

According to The American Mosquito Control Association, AMCA, a nonprofit organization that provides information and education to help communities suppress the mosquito population,  many mosquito problems in your neighborhoods are likely to come from water filled containers.

Now, imagine the unintended containers left at an illegal dump site.  Just to name a few, there are tires, mattresses, and toys.  Left unattended these articles accumulate more than enough stagnate water to attract and breed mosquitoes.

With the large amounts of rain and snow most cities have experienced this winter and spring, there is a lot of standing water.  And there are a lot of Illegal Dumping Sites.  Therefore, the probability of pestilence is high this year.

Illegal Dumping is a problem cities should take seriously. Thankfully, most people dispose of their trash in a responsible way.  However, there are some who do not, and the rest of the population is counting on the cities to do everything they can to prevent the  mosquito borne diseases that are plaguing the communities.  What is your city doing to prevent illegal dumping, the mosquito breeding grounds?