Safe Parks-Crime Deterrent Program

Safe Parks-Crime Deterrent Program

Now in post pandemic times, people have learned, health is more important than ever. When the immune system is down, it becomes difficult to fight off viruses and infections. When your body is not as prime as it could be, mental health also suffers. Mental and physical health are directly related: mental health impacts physical health and vice versa. More and more studies are coming out to show how important outdoor activity is.

 

Nature is imperative to our health. For example, we need vitamin D for both our physical and emotional health. Historically, the public park was created with mental health in mind. Parks encourage physical activity and people who live close to parks are more prone to use them for exercise. Without scenic recreational areas, people are more likely to suffer from obesity and depression. Beauty is necessary for the public health.

 

We take nature and aesthetics for granted. We take advantage of pristine parks and do not think about the care and effort that is put into keeping it desirable to communities. We do not think about the communities that cannot afford to do what it takes to keep parks free of litter and vandalism. It takes work to keep parks aesthetically appealing and free from graffiti and vandalism.

 

Unfortunately, most parks suffer from illegal dumping, graffiti, vandalism, and other quality of life crimes. And quality of life crimes at parks make parks unsafe.  Therefore, people are not able to enjoy the benefits that a healthy park provides. Harming parks harms the entire community.

 

Traditional video surveillance does not stop quality of life crimes.  Therefore, Parks and Recreation Departments need to implement a Park Crime Deterrent Program utilizing specialized equipment designed to deter quality of life crimes.

 

We need to keep our parks clean and safe for our health and restore our communities to their original glory.

 

Stop Illegal Dumping in the Cities

Stop Illegal Dumping in the Cities

Illegal trash dumping in cities not only carries a horrid smell and is ugly to see, it also attracts flies, mosquitos, cockroaches, mice, rats, and other vermin. This creates an unpleasant experience for those who live and do business in the city, but it also poses a serious health hazard.

Cockroaches and mice are creatures that have more in common than I’m sure most of us would like to admit. They both carry disease and are filthy, they are both very fast and can fit into tiny cracks and crevices, and both groups can also multiply at excessively fast rates, making the extermination task that much more difficult to accomplish.

Living spaces within the city tend to already be on the smaller side.  People start to feel crammed in their mini hobbit-sized apartments, causing them to get rid of more of their less favorite stuff.  A common dilemma too that city folks run into is thrift stores have strict rules about the donations they accept, especially since Covid-19. Also, bulk items carry a price to pay in order to be picked up.  When legal dump sites for bulk items cost more than people are willing to pay, and at the same time your urban neighbor is getting sick of their shabby-chic rocking chair that’s falling apart and handed down by their grandmother, they might be tempted to illegally dump the item into the dumpster or at another illegal dump site.

Dumpsters become full past their prime quickly within the city.  If city folks encounter this when they go to throw out their trash, where else are they going to dump it?  This leads to an ever-increasing problem of these vermin attraction sites in urban areas.  Others are the negligent type, or just don’t care anymore since the city already has litter speckled about in every alleyway.  If the city has a high homelessness rate, that also contributes to its increased illegal waste-dumping problem.

Next time your city council has a meeting about shrinking your city’s illegal dumping crisis, learn how to implement an effective Illegal Dumping Enforcement Program.

What is your city doing to stop illegal dumping?

Stop Drug Abuse in Parks

Stop Drug Abuse in Parks

As the opioid crisis continues to grow amidst the pandemic, ongoing addictions are nurtured, and drug dealers’ wallets get fatter while they sling dope within the parks and recreational borders. This usually happens right under the nose of the public eye.  Oftentimes this is the case even in broad daylight, as it is the illegal dealer’s career to be the master of behavioral disguise. Of course, if the park visitor does not even notice the drug-deals taking place, then they will not report it.

This leads to a vicious cycle, as the devoted addict is so eager to get their fix. They find a comfortable spot and end up shooting up right there while still in the park. What the park ends up with is a hoard of sold souls overdosing across its premises. Allowing this tricky situation to continue clearly does not help, but it contributes to, the opioid crisis.

It is a plausible idea to add more park surveillance. However, round-the-clock surveillance can swiftly get expensive. We must at the same time remember how surveying all the drug crimes within the park does not prevent them from happening.

Prosecutions are a whole lot more difficult to prove as well when there is no clean-cut evidence beyond a reasonable doubt. The criminal must be caught in the act in order to face genuine scrutiny. All these factors are important for Parks & Recreation Departments to think about when planning crime reduction strategies.

The solution then does not lie on focusing in on monitoring each drug abuser that visits the park, but instead on preventing the drug deals from taking place in the parks. There is tool designed to deter nuisance crimes in parks, including drug deals and abuse.

We all have a part to play. Parks and Recreation can do something about the substance abuse crisis, especially if there is a means to deter drug crimes in the parks. Before long, the bad guys will be running speedily away from the park as soon as they enter!

What is Parks Department doing to stop the drug crisis happening in your parks?

Illegal Dumping Pollutes Water

Illegal Dumping Pollutes Water

Public water supplies can become a public health threat if the waterways are contaminated by toxic waste.  This is especially true when the environment encounters the illegal dumping of waste chemicals.  The toxic chemicals enter water wells and other ground water supplies. Common scenarios are illegal dumping sites that contain chemicals that seep into the ground connecting with underground waterways and/or when it rains the rains carry the toxic waste into waterways.

This type of situation happens more often than cities are aware of, as people who illegally dump try to hide the fact that they are doing it.  When this form of illegal dumping continues to go unchecked, it can lead to any number of serious health complications for the population who use the water supply.

There is a good reason the manufacturers of cleaning agents are legally expected to label their products with a hazard warning sign, if it contains hazardous substances that are known to be harmful to humans. Not doing so is dangerous, and the manufacturer is held liable if anyone is harmed by their failure to do so.

Furthermore, certain chemicals become even more toxic when cross-contaminated with other chemicals.  The likelihood of this happening increases when companies regularly dispose of their waste solutions by directly dumping them into public water drains or close to underground water sources.

The solution to preventing this type of public health hazard is simple: protect the water supply from illegal dumping of any sort.  Although regular water testing for chemicals is important – sometimes to help identify if people are dumping chemicals – once the source of the issue is nailed down, it can be easily stopped.

It is paramount that every city enacts an illegal dumping prevention program!